Multiplication, although it is usually used in this way in computer programming languages, and it spreads from computer programming languages ​​to e-mail and Internet * meaning in math multiplication symbols, of which only pure The text was once allowed. In mathematics, multiplication can be represented by juxtaposition, such as 2 xy, 2X is, or use parentheses, such as (2) (3) (2) (3) or use a dot as a binary operator, such as 5 · 8. 5 ⋅8.

In mathematical analysis (including probability theory), the asterisk is a common symbol for convolution of two functions

(f*g) (x) = ∫∞− ∞F( t) g( x − t )d ton. (F*G)(X)=∫-∞∞F(ton)G(X-ton)dton.

In algebra, the asterisk is used for general binary operations, but other symbols are also used in this way, such as ⊡, ⊙, ⊗, ⋆ .⊡,⊙,⊗,⋆. meaning in math

As a superscript or subscript, such as X*X* or X*,X*, the asterisk may mean another variable X, X, or it may mean that some specific function is applied to X, X, or it may Just some other variables, because a lot of variables are already used and another variable is needed.

In complex analysis, the complex conjugate is usually represented by an overline, such as X + Iÿ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ = x – iy, X+I is ¯=X-I is, but when When the overline is not available (for example, when writing mathematics on a typewriter), the asterisk is sometimes used for complex conjugates, (x + iy)*= x – i y. (X+一世是)*=X-一世是.

In set theory, the asterisk is sometimes used as the complement of a set. Seconds*= {x ∣ x ∉ S}, Seconds *= {* meaning in math}, although overscores or prime numbers are also used for this purpose.

In linear algebra, the asterisk is sometimes used for matrix transposition, although prime numbers and superscript T are also used here. In a nutshell, the volts in the dual space volts * volts * vector space are usually represented by asterisks. More generally, not only in linear algebra, duality is represented by an asterisk.

The Kleene star is represented by an asterisk, which represents a language generated by any connection.

The asterisk is actually a universal symbol. In any field where there is no standard symbol for it, it is usually used for any content that the author wants to use. In this case, the author will explain its meaning.

Depending on the context, it has many different meanings. Basically, if a person doing math needs a symbol to represent something, and they have not used * for other things, they can use *.

Sometimes a * meaning in math a kind of * B represents a binary operation applied to one kind and B B. Multiplication is usually written as nothing in mathematics, such as a b a kind of B, but for some purposes, such as in some computers In programming languages, we need an actual symbol to represent multiplication, and * is a popular choice. (The multiplication sign is a bit easy to confuse with x, and it is not an ASCII character, so it is a bit difficult to enter it in many cases.) However, in abstract algebraic structures, sometimes people want operations that are visible in symbols. So, for example, I saw that Wikipedia uses a centered point for calculations, and gave the definition of “monoid” ( Monoid-Wikipedia  ) but other authors use * instead of points.

If volt is a vector space, volt * volt * is its dual space. Many ways to use * are dual. In a sense, volts ∗ volts are the same volts, but in this case, double-dual may be larger than the original.

If a kind of is a linear operator between vector spaces, a kind of * kind of * represents an adjoint of one kind of one kind (see Hermite adjoint-Wikipedia  ).

If XX and Yes Yes are two topological spaces (such as curves or surfaces) then X* is X* is sometimes used to denote their shredded products ( shredded products-Wikipedia  ). This is a way of combining them to create another space Methods.

If FF is a function between spaces, F*F* and F*F* have been used to represent other functions by FF.

In category theory, sometimes they define a functor that accepts an arbitrary set and adds an element to it, and the added element is sometimes expressed as *.

We may find an almost unlimited list of other examples, but these are the first things I thought of.

* What does it mean in mathematics? Gyre’s advertising Gyre — a recurring streaming service. By streaming video 24/7, Gyre can significantly increase your channel traffic and revenue. Free trial 16 answersDavid Joyce , Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania Mathematics (1979) Answered 1 a year ago  · Upvoted by Robbie Goetschalckx , computer scientist, 11 years and loves mathematics since childhood. ·The author has 8K answers and 25.6M answers

The asterisk has many uses in mathematics. Sometimes it is displayed as a binary operator, such as x * y, is, sometimes as superscript X*, X*, sometimes as subscript X*.X*. By the way, because the word “asterisk” is more difficult Pronunciation, many people pronounce it as “star”.

As a binary operator, the asterisk is rarely used to denote multiplication, although it is usually used in this way in computer programming languages, and it spreads from computer programming languages ​​to e-mail and Internet multiplication symbols, of which only pure The text was once allowed. In mathematics, multiplication can be represented by juxtaposition, such as 2 xy, 2X is, or use parentheses, such as (* meaning in math) (3) (2) (3) or use a dot as a binary operator, such as 5 · 8. 5 ⋅8.

In mathematical analysis (including probability theory), the asterisk is a common symbol for convolution of two functions

(f*g) (x) = ∫∞− ∞F( t) g( x − t )d ton. (F*G)(X)=∫-∞∞F(ton)G(X-ton)dton.

In algebra, the asterisk is used for general binary operations, but other symbols are also used in this way, such as ⊡, ⊙, ⊗, ⋆ .⊡,⊙,⊗,⋆.

As a superscript or subscript, such as X*X* or X*,X*, the asterisk may mean another variable X, X, or it may mean that some specific function is applied to X, X, or it may Just some other variables, because a lot of variables are already used and another variable is needed.

In complex analysis, the complex conjugate is usually represented by an overline, such as X + I ÿ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ = x – iy, X+I is ¯=X-I is, but when When the overline is not available (for example, when writing mathematics on a typewriter), the asterisk is sometimes used for complex conjugates, (x + iy)*= x – i y. (X+一世是)*=X-一世是.

In set theory, the asterisk is sometimes used as the complement of a set. Seconds*= {x ∣ x ∉ S}, Seconds *= {X∣X∉sec}, although overscores or prime numbers are also used for this purpose.

In linear algebra, the asterisk is sometimes used for matrix transposition, although prime numbers and superscript T are also used here. In a nutshell, the volts in the dual space volts * volts * vector space are usually represented by asterisks. More generally, not only in linear algebra, duality is represented by an asterisk.

The Kleene star is represented by an asterisk, which represents a language generated by any connection.

The asterisk is actually a universal symbol. In any field where it does not yet have a standard symbol, it is usually used for any content that the author wants to use. In this case, the author will explain its meaning. 8.2K ​​Views View Yes Votes · Asked to answer 312 related questions about Fragrant Fantauzzi , San Francisco Blanco and 11 more (more answers are below) What does the * symbol in mathematics mean? 3,391 views * What does the symbol mean in mathematics? 3,696 views What does the asterisk in mathematics mean? 8,824 views What does [] mean in mathematics? What do you mean by 3,634 views in mathematics? 2,204 viewsKeith Ramsey , Ph.D. 3 years before answering in mathematics · By Upvoted Anton Fahlgren , MS Mathematics, Stockholm University (2018) and Terry Moore , MA Mathematics, University of Southampton (1968) · Authors have 2.6 K’s answer and 2.9M answer views

Depending on the context, it has many different meanings. Basically, if a person doing math needs a symbol to represent something, and they have not used * for other things, they can use *.

Sometimes a * b a kind of * B represents a binary operation applied to one kind and B B. Multiplication is usually written as nothing in mathematics, such as a b a kind of B, but for some purposes, such as in some computers In programming languages, we need an actual symbol to represent multiplication, and * is a popular choice. (The multiplication sign is a bit easy to confuse with x, and it is not an ASCII character, so it is a bit difficult to enter it in many cases.) However, in abstract algebraic structures, sometimes people want operations that are visible in symbols. So, for example, I saw that Wikipedia uses a centered point for calculations, and gave the definition of “monoid” ( Monoid-Wikipedia  ) but other authors use * instead of points.

If volt is a vector space, volt * volt * is its dual space. Many ways to use * are dual. In a sense, volts ∗ volts are the same volts, but in this case, double-dual may be larger than the original.

If a kind of is a linear operator between vector spaces, a kind of * kind of * represents an adjoint of one kind of one kind (see Hermite adjoint-Wikipedia  ).

If XX and Yes Yes are two topological spaces (such as curves or surfaces) then X* is X* is sometimes used to denote their shredded products ( shredded products-Wikipedia  ). This is a way of combining them to create another space Methods.

If FF is a function between spaces, F*F* and F*F* have been used to represent other functions by FF.

In category theory, sometimes they define a functor that accepts an arbitrary set and adds an element to it, and the added element is sometimes expressed as *.

We may find an almost unlimited list of other examples, but these are the first things I thought of. 12.2K Views View Yes 112 Sponsored by the life insurance company Savings and safety: enjoy the dual benefits of LIC’s SIP. Invest your hard-earned money while also providing financial protection for your family. Buy it online! Learn moreHoward Ludwig , Ph.D. Northwestern University Physics (1982) Answered 1 year ago  · Upvoted by David Joyce , Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania Mathematics (1979) · The author has 1.6K answers and 4.8M answer views

”  What does * meaning in math in mathematics? “

First of all, have you noticed the difference between the two symbols: **?

Although the two symbols themselves look very similar in appearance, there is a key difference: the first character is raised on the line as if it is a superscript, while the second character is not. The first one is the one used in the question, which can be found on most Latin keyboards, so it is easy to find and type. Both are in the Unicode character set, * meaning in math is in the ASCII subset (u+002A, and * is in the mathematical symbol part of Unicode (u+2217, called ASTERISK OPERATOR). In ordinary writing, the asterisk is a superscript and usually means footnote.

The requested * is implicitly superscripted in a mathematical context in the following way:

  •  * is usually used in physical and engineering applications of mathematics to represent the complex conjugate of a complex number  (or matrix element). In mathematical applications, \overline{z} is the more common notation for complex conjugate.
  •  * is sometimes used in group theory to represent the set of unit elements in the ring structure R.
  • In formal language theory, Σ  * is the set of all character strings that can be formed from the letter set Σ . Regular expression ab &  *   *  D will represent any in a string that begins, followed by any non-negative integer (including 0)  , followed by c any non-negative integer, followed by a  , which is the end of the string. This operator is called the Kleene star operator.

If we want the asterisk operator, which is in the center of the text line instead of superscript (although this is not what the question requires), it is used as:

  •  ∗  b is used to indicate any general binary operation applied to operands a and b , just as  (   ) is usually used to indicate some arbitrary general function of x .
  • ˚F  * g )(  ) is used to indicate the convolution of two functions ˚F and gram , which is not the product ˚F  (  ) times gram (  ).

The superscript or inline form of the asterisk may have other very specialized uses, but these are most common in mathematics (or applied mathematics, such as physics or engineering).

However, there is an explanation that many people think of but is not a usage in mathematics, which means multiplication. Mathematicians already have four commonly used methods of expressing multiplication: ×, ⋅, spaces, juxtaposition without spaces or graphic symbols-never as * or *; four options are enough, and the asterisk sign means something else . * It is used to represent multiplication in many computer programming languages. Because most languages ​​prohibit implicit operations, it is the closest symbol similar to * meaning in math or ⋅ on the Latin keyboard; the letter x is usually used as a variable name, and a period (.) is used Marked with a decimal point, so these are not appropriate. However, just because * is popular for expressing multiplication in programming languages, and you want to enter a mathematical expression on a normal keyboard, this cannot prove or excuse the use of * to express multiplication in a mathematical environment. This is not to use *, x (ex letters on the keyboard), X (ex uppercase letters) or representative of a mathematical text multiplication – if you do so, do not ignorant or lazy to learn how to insert and character × ⋅ Come and communicate clearly and correctly.
The product of two numbers is usually represented by ×, or parentheses around one or two factors: 3 × 5 or 3(5) or (3)(5). The centered point can easily be confused with the decimal point.
A number and a variable or the product of two variables are usually represented by ⋅ or juxtaposition. The × symbol is easily confused with the variable letter x .
The product of a number and a unit of measurement symbol is almost always indicated by a space (mandatory-degrees of angle, arc minutes, and arc seconds are a set of exceptions).
The product of two measurement units is indicated by a space or ⋅.

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